A Brief History of the Minimoog Monophonic Analog Synthesizer (1970-1981)

It’s like an infomercial, really! Nonetheless, it’s a chance for the Moog and synthesizer fiends to watch some great musicians play the Moog Minimoog and hear once again, why the Moog Minimoog was such an important instrument for Electronic, Jazz, and some long-haired prog-rockers.

The Minimoog (a monophonic analog synthesizer) was invented by Bill Hemsath and Robert Moog. It was orginally released in 1970 by R.A. Moog Inc. (Moog Music after 1972), and production was stopped in 1981. The Moog was re-designed by Robert Moog in 2002 and released as the Minimoog Voyager.

Also, if you want to see Martin L. Gore (Depeche Mode) with his Minimoog go here.

From Youtube:
Follow the life of the Minimoog Synthesizer from its inception through its prolific contributions to popular music throughout the last 4 decades.

In this first installment documenting the journey of the Minimoog synth through the 1970’s, we explore the musicians and the people that were instrumental in bringing the instrument to prominence. We also sit with one of Moog Music’s earliest engineers, Bill Hemsath, who recalls the process of the Minimoog’s birth and sheds some light on what sets the Moog synthesizer apart from other analog synths.

See more Moog history here: http://www.moogmusic.com/legacy

Jessica Rylan of Flower Electronics: Artist Talk at MIT (TechTV)

I am a quite fond of Jessica Rylan. I wanted to write a much more in depth post about her…she fascinates me that much. However, I just haven’t gotten around to it and I wanted to post this video as it’s been sitting in my drafts for quite some time. I just had to share it with you.

I love my Little Boy Blue synthesizer. This is one of the synthesizers she manufactured at her Flower Electronics company.

If you have a spare hour check this lecture out. You won’t be let down by her intellect and vision. This talk takes place at MIT on June 29, 2009. At this lecture she talks about her music, noise, some of her favorite noise artists and her theories on chaos just for starters. She discusses transistors in good detail. Rylan discusses Don Buchla and what it was like working for him. In the early 1990’s she was able to refurbish the Harvard University Buchla 100 system, at a time when she couldn’t afford one. One of my favorite anecdotes was her commentary on Bob Moog and his comments on Keith Emerson. Very good stuff!

Check out some of the The Synthesizer Book videos on Youtube here).

From MIT site:
A sound artist and electronic musician who builds unique analog synthesizers, Rylan has performed across North America and throughout Europe, Russia, and Scandinavia; conducted workshops in Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Ghent, Belgium; and Kabelvåg, Norway; and created sound installations at MIT’s LIST Visual Arts Center, the Boston Center for the Arts, and elsewhere. Her recordings are available on labels including Important Records, Ecstatic Peace, and RRRecords.

I’m really looking forward to getting my hands on her new Jealous Hearts Modular Synthesizer

Features:
voltage controlled low frequency oscillator (LFO)
asymmetrical multimode filter (low pass/bandpass/high pass)
1/4″ input with variable gain
white and dark noise
two audio inputs, one with -/+ attenuator
two filter cutoff voltage control inputs, one with -/+ attenuator
powder-coated aluminum case
supplied with:
battery
set of 7 banana patch cords

http://flowerelectronics.com/