Gavin Russom demonstrates Moog Gear On x SELF TITLED EP (Download Music|See Video)

Gavin Russom walks through the process of creating a track for ‪‎Moog‬ Music and self-titled magazine.

To see the video go here.

GAVIN RUSSOM || SPECTRUM ANALYSIS|

From Moog Music
Drawing the ‘Spectrum Analysis’ card and armed with a battery of Moog gear, Gavin Russom set off crafting what he calls a “holistic workout”: an organic opus that grows and evolves over the course of 11 minutes. Learn about his process here.

“I found interesting ways to use the new Moog gear, playing the knobs live and thinking of ways to use each piece that might not be the standard “set and forget” approach. Keeping everything moving like that made each sound feel alive.”

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A Brief History of the Minimoog Monophonic Analog Synthesizer (1970-1981)

It’s like an infomercial, really! Nonetheless, it’s a chance for the Moog and synthesizer fiends to watch some great musicians play the Moog Minimoog and hear once again, why the Moog Minimoog was such an important instrument for Electronic, Jazz, and some long-haired prog-rockers.

The Minimoog (a monophonic analog synthesizer) was invented by Bill Hemsath and Robert Moog. It was orginally released in 1970 by R.A. Moog Inc. (Moog Music after 1972), and production was stopped in 1981. The Moog was re-designed by Robert Moog in 2002 and released as the Minimoog Voyager.

Also, if you want to see Martin L. Gore (Depeche Mode) with his Minimoog go here.

From Youtube:
Follow the life of the Minimoog Synthesizer from its inception through its prolific contributions to popular music throughout the last 4 decades.

In this first installment documenting the journey of the Minimoog synth through the 1970’s, we explore the musicians and the people that were instrumental in bringing the instrument to prominence. We also sit with one of Moog Music’s earliest engineers, Bill Hemsath, who recalls the process of the Minimoog’s birth and sheds some light on what sets the Moog synthesizer apart from other analog synths.

See more Moog history here: http://www.moogmusic.com/legacy